What is TTL and is it any good on the Godox AD600?

In this article, I aim to explain what TTL is, what is does and how it can be implemented into a photographic workflow. I also go on to share my test images from a recent shoot where I tested the TTL abilities of the Godox AD600 / PixaPro Citi600 TTL / Flashpoint Xplor 600 TTL […]

The post What is TTL and is it any good on the Godox AD600? appeared first on DIY Photography.

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How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

The experience of the hustle and bustle that comes from shooting in high-traffic, highly photographed areas is a pain that most photographers know all too well. People can be packed into overlooks and pull-offs with hardly even room to stand let alone set up a tripod.

It seems as if everyone is trying to get the same shot. Not that there’s something incredibly wrong with making photographs just like the person standing next to you. If you are simply after a snapshot to record where you’ve been then a quick capture or two taken from the herd will do just fine.

How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

However, if you’re like me, you probably want more from a location than just a cookie cutter photo. When I visit a well-known photo spot that is crowded with people all shooting the exact same thing, I feel a need to produce something that is more of an artistic expression of how I view the scene.

While recently shooting in Yosemite National Park, I observed this situation in full force. But how can you shoot in these high-traffic areas creatively? Believe it or not, in some cases it doesn’t require too much effort in order to breathe new life into a stale or overshot scene. In this article, we’re going to talk about three ways that can help you break the monotony and guide you toward making your photos of well-known areas less ordinary.

#1 – Get High…Get Low

Changing from the common perspective to one that is either more or less elevated can have a huge impact on the final interest of your photographs. Often times, the majority of photographers shoot from the same plane of view each and every time which often produces literal “photocopies” of the same location.

This changeup doesn’t have to be anything drastic, either. It can be as simple as holding your camera at waist level or even above your head.

How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

If you’re able to be more adventurous, then search for even more unique vantage points. Ones which can show people a well-known place from a different angle than what they’re used to seeing. This is the key to setting yourself apart as a photographer.

How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

This was just up the road from the famous Tunnel View in Yosemite. While it’s virtually the same landscape, the higher elevation adds a different feel to the scene.

#2 – Shoot at Night

This is likely the easiest and most powerful methods of creatively photographing popular locations. There’s almost always less crowding (unless it’s a spot popular exclusively at night) which will give you much more room and creates a more relaxed experience.

However, the most obvious benefit that comes from shooting at night is the instant change in the visual appeal of the landscape.

How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

The inclusion of stars and moonlight or even bright city lights and cars can add so much to a scene that has been completely worn out during the day. If it can be done safely, I urge you try out shooting a popular destination at night during your next photo excursion. You just might get hooked.

#3 – Ignore the Popular Subject

Yeah I know, this is one idea that is difficult for some people to get a handle on initially. Please don’t misunderstand me here, I’m not talking about completely disregarding the main attraction. Rather, place the popular subject within your photograph in such a way that is still recognizable but doesn’t consume the composition.

How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

Just remember that if you want to produce something truly unique you will have to learn how to think critically and creatively about what you’re shooting and why. This means coming up with new ways to display the subject in a way that might not have been considered by many others.

How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

This image was made while standing shoulder to shoulder with about 25 other folks. I happened to notice the reflection of Half Dome in the water and decided to approach the scene in a more surreal, abstract way.

Some Final Thoughts

There will be times when a location becomes almost too popular for its own good. Even beautifully majestic locations can become artistically depleted. This is when we as photographers have to stretch our creative legs to produce more unique images.

While there’s nothing wrong with shooting alongside the masses, the overall power of an image can be lessened if every photo of a place looks exactly the same as the next 50 images. Here’s a recap of some ways you can shoot a little more creatively:

  • Change your perspective. Try shooting from a higher or lower vantage point than is usually seen.
  • Try the nighttime. Popular locations are often deserted at night. Night photography will also give you the opportunity to present the scene in a way that might not be common.
  • Move the primary subject to the back burner. Try setting the commonly shot subject matter as the secondary subject.

Adding a little spice to your images taken in such high-traffic places can be a lot easier than you might think and can work wonders for your photography. A little effort truly goes a long way.

The post How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively by Adam Welch appeared first on Digital Photography School.

Hasselblad cuts out the middleman – launches new direct rental service

Hasselblad is officially introducing the “Rent a Hasselblad” service, which will be available across the globe. No matter if you need it for a special photoshoot, or you just want to try it out, from now on you’ll be able to rent medium format cameras and lenses straight from Hasselblad’s official service. Bronius Rudnickas, Hasselblad […]

The post Hasselblad cuts out the middleman – launches new direct rental service appeared first on DIY Photography.

6 Tips For Photographing Cities In The Snow

As we revel in the golden colors of autumn here in the Northern climes, we are acutely aware of what’s to follow. That, of course, is winter – a time of short hours of daylight, cloud, and cold. However, for many of us, there will be times when it snows and snow is a wonderful plaything for us photographers.

Snow utterly changes the landscape, making the familiar seem eerily new. Perhaps the biggest change we see after a good snowfall is in towns and cities. The familiar green-grey of a city’s infrastructure is transformed into a sea of pristine white. Today we are going to look at some ideas and practicalities for shooting snowbound cities.

Go Early

Going early has two meanings. Firstly, early as in as soon as the snow has fallen, perhaps even while it is falling. Once cities come to life after a snowfall, people and cars grind the beautiful white stuff into a grey slushy mush. Keep an eye on the weather forecast and make sure you’re prepared to get out as soon as the snow falls.

The other early is of course early in the morning. The low sun of winter adds a particular beauty to the golden hour. Long soft shadows on pure white snow, soft golden light on buildings and other elements that go to make up city life. With the cold mornings, you may well get mist, fog and even steam venting into the streets all adding an immense beauty to even the dullest of cities.

A snowy dawn is a great time to be a photographer. By Kevin Kelley

Details And People

Don’t just think big and wide when shooting snow. Cities after snowfall are full of amazing little details. Snow piled up on car wing mirrors, the last leaves of autumn on fresh snow, icicles on a park bench. Take a macro lens if you have one, if not try to get in close to all the tiny details that snowfall affords.

As well as the details, street and people photographers will have a field day. Whether it is people struggling to walk to work on icy pavements or bright colored winter clothes contracting the white snow and grey city. Even posed portraits can look great in a snowbound city.

Don’t forget the details. By Michael Pardo

Evening And Night

Snowbound cityscapes take on a special beauty in the blue hour and into the night. The vast expanses of white reflect the city’s bright lights back against the buildings, filling in nooks and crannies where normally dark shadows would reside. Often the coldness will create a slight mistiness to the air. In turn, this makes the bright lights of the city take on a halo effect adding further mystery to the shots. The colors of city lights are also enhanced by the mist.

Snowbound architecture looks great at night. By Jason Row Photography

Shooting As It Snows

There is a special kind of beauty in capturing the snow as it falls. It can be quite tricky and you will need to be confident that you have a weather sealed camera and lens. If you are not sure, or your camera is not weather sealed, try shooting from under cover.

As with motion in any shot, you can choose how to capture the falling snow. Slow shutter speeds will create a blurred effect to the snowflakes while raising the shutter speed will freeze their motion. Focusing is key too. Because snowflakes are so small you need your focus point to be relatively close to the camera. If you need the background in focus, aim for a smaller aperture to increase the depth of field.

Going High

Another great way to capture snow in the city is from a high perspective. This might be atop a tall building or by using a drone. Be careful to stay within the safety limits of your drone both for temperature and where you fly. Looking down on snowbound rooftops, you will see splashes of color, perhaps watery sunshine and steam coming from heating vents. Trees with leaves remaining add further definition to the scene below.

Getting high is another way to add a new dimension to your city snowscapes. By Jason Row Photography

Practicalities

Your first concern when shooting a winter cityscape should be for yourself. Wrap up warm with multiple layers and thick-soled, insulated boots. Use a pair of gloves, perhaps with fingertips cut off, to enable you to work with your camera. You will be standing around a lot trying to get the shots and it is easy to not realize how cold you have become.

Your camera will go through batteries at a much higher rate so make sure you have spares and that they are fully charged. Keep them in your pockets close to your skin before use. This will allow them to retain some heat and hopefully last longer. Make sure you do not have anything else metallic in the same pocket as a battery.

When it comes to shooting, most cameras will tend to underexpose snow scenes. Try opening up the aperture or try dropping the shutter speed by one stop to compensate. If in doubt, bracket your images with a bias towards the overexposed side. Colour is another area where cameras might get it wrong in the snow. This is particularly true in the blue hour and at night. The simple solution is to shoot RAW, this will allow you to control the white balance in post-production.

Winter need not be a time to pack away our cameras and return to a warm fire and a pair of slippers. Snow can transform even the most mundane looking town or city into a special kind of beauty. Keep an eye on the weather forecast and if you see snow coming, get those batteries on charge.

For More Tips On Shooting Snow

The post 6 Tips For Photographing Cities In The Snow appeared first on Light Stalking.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations

Want to frame the perfect image of your favorite winter landscape? Nine photographers talk strategies for taking amazing destination photos.

Top Image by Nejdet Duzen.

Clearing Winter Storm, a 1937 photograph by the great Ansel Adams, is one of the most well-known landscape images of all time. In the past eighty years, countless photographers have flocked to Yosemite National Park with their cameras and tripods in hopes of capturing just a glimpse of what Adams saw.

Still, few people have the tenacity and patience to create a picture like Clearing Winter Storm; Adams completed arduous, sometimes dangerous hikes through rock and snow, all while carrying his heavy camera, lenses, and glass plate negatives. He famously devoted weeks on end to exploring and discovering new vantage points. Truly original images can only be realized with a combination of research, luck, and dedication.

In honor of the winter season, we collected this series of beautiful and refreshing photographs from well-known destinations around the world. If Ansel Adams spent his whole life finding different ways to photograph Yosemite, certainly there are undiscovered corners remaining in even the most popular winter locations today. We asked nine outstanding photographers to tell us about their favorite spots.

1.  “Of all the Patagonia landmarks, I was most impressed by the Perito Moreno Glacier.”

saiko3p (Andrey Khrobostov)

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Perito Moreno Glacier

Image by saiko3p (Andrey Khrobostov). Gear: Canon Canon 5D Mark II camera, EF 17-40 f4L lens. Settings: Focal length 19mm; Exposure 1/160 sec; F8; ISO 100.

What are some of your favorite spots in Patagonia?

I had only one month for my trip to Patagonia, but I hope to go back there again. It’s one of the best landscapes in the world. Of all the Patagonia landmarks, I was most impressed by the Perito Moreno Glacier.

At first, when I was planning the trip, I did not even want to include it on my route through Argentina. I had seen glaciers many times before-in the Himalayas, the Andes, and the Caucasus, for example. But I still included the Perito Moreno Glacier, and I did not regret it. It is especially amazing in real life; you can feel its great power and vitality.

When I was at the glacier, I was lucky enough to catch the moment when a full piece broke off. The glacier is 74 meters above the water, so the equivalent of a 24-story apartment building collapsed into the water. It was amazing! The sound was as if someone had just exploded a huge bomb, and a tall wave ran through the water. After the collapse, the glacier cried aloud for fifteen to twenty minutes as if it were alive. It is also worth mentioning that the width of the tongue of the glacier is five kilometers, and the thickness of the underwater part is about 170 meters.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Patagonia

Image by saiko3p (Andrey Khrobostov).

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

I find inspiration by walking around in nature and observing the environment. Also, I find inspiration in my favorite music: ambient, deep techno, deep house, etc. When I travel, I like to taste new wines. Argentina is one of the best choices for this. See you in Argentina!

2.  “The Canadian Rockies are like Disneyland for landscape photographers.”

Autumn Sky Photography

Image by Autumn Sky Photography. Gear: Canon EOS 6D full-frame SLR camera, Canon 24-105L lens, Circular Polarizer B&W, Tripod. Settings: Focal length 24mm; exposure 1/30 sec; f8; ISO 160.

What are some of your favorite spots in the Canadian Rockies?

The Canadian Rockies are like Disneyland for landscape photographers. Picking a favorite spot is like asking a mother to pick her favorite child-they are all special in their own way! One can happily spend a lifetime exploring and still just see a fraction of the extraordinary natural beauty this corner of the world offers. The image above, for example, was taken in Bow Valley Provincial Park at the entrance to the Canadian Rockies after early snowfall one October a few years ago. There is an easy hiking trail that gets you to this point, called “Many Springs Lake.”

For the last couple of years, I’ve found myself returning to two special areas along the Icefields Parkway, one of the most scenic drives in the world, linking Banff and Jasper National Park. The first one starts from the popular Bow Lake, about forty minutes north of Lake Louise. While most casual visitors stop here, the rewards are reached when you venture deep into the backcountry.

A few years ago, from the summit of Mount Jimmy Simpson, I spotted a small body of water tucked behind Crowfoot Mountain. It intrigued me, but I found no information online-it was totally uncharted territory! I returned in the summer of 2017 and found my way to this unnamed body of water. Describing the feeling of reaching this spot is impossible. The sense of accomplishment, the sense of wonder-a photographer’s candy store. I spent a couple of hours just walking with my camera hanging around my neck, taking photos.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Crowfoot Mountain

Image by Autumn Sky Photography.

The second one is the Howse River valley, the historic Fur Trade Route between Alberta and British Columbia. The hiking trail starts near Saskatchewan River Crossing and leads to the scenic overlook of Howse River, complete with the iconic red Adirondack chairs placed there by Parks Canada.

The official hiking trail continues to the right, but the real scenic reward lies in descending left to River Flats and exploring this vast valley of wilderness, just like the old pioneers did a long time ago. In March of 2017, I followed wolf tracks through the canyon draining Glacier Lake and surprised a colony of Canadian wild geese frolicking in this wilderness. I found complete tranquility-pure nature completely detached from the hustle and bustle of modern civilization.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Howse River Valley

Image by Autumn Sky Photography.

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

My photography was born from my love for the outdoors. Most people who enjoy the outdoors take photos, but for me, they are more; they are memories. I have one photo that I took on the crater rim of Mount Kilimanjaro. I watched the African sunrise after a cold night in howling winds and freezing temperatures. I felt many times that I wanted to quit, but when I look at this photo now, I feel the same excitement I did then! I want to make my photos more than casual snapshots. I want them to be quality captures of moments in space and time.

3.  “There are some amazing photo opportunities with the old barns against the Wasatch Mountains…”

Johnny Adolphson

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Park City

Image by Johnny Adolphson. Gear: Canon 6D camera, Canon 24-105 F4 L lens, Manfrotto tripod, Da Kine camera pack. Settings: Focal length 105mm; exposure 6 sec; f13; ISO 100.

What are some of your favorite spots in Park City, Utah?

A spot I always love to photograph in Park City is the McPolin Farmstead and Barn on SR-224 in Snyderville Basin. It’s a really neat slice of local history and lore with a classic white barn that is always photogenic, especially in winter with the fresh snow and crisp mountain air.

Another place to visit on a rest day from skiing is rural Heber Valley, just minutes south of Park City. There are some amazing photo opportunities with the old barns against the Wasatch Mountains and the iconic Mount Timpanogos reflecting in Deer Creek Reservoir.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Utah

Image by Johnny Adolphson.

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

I’m inspired by frosty air and the snowcapped mountains we have here in Utah. It’s amazing how fresh snow can create an entirely new composition in the same location. I’m always amazed by the winter landscapes I see on Instagram from great photographers around Utah. You can see more of my Utah images on my feed @johnnyadolphsonphotography.

4.  “Perlan is my go-to spot for panoramic city views.”

Keong Da Great

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Iceland

Image by Keong Da Great. Gear: Canon 5D Mark II camera, with Tamron 28-300mm F3.5-6.3 VC lens. Settings: Focal length 135mm; exposure 1/1250s sec; f11; ISO 800.

What are some of your favorite spots in Reykjavík?

The only thing I can say about Iceland is how unforgettably gorgeous it is. I have never visited such amazing terrain before. Perlan is my go-to spot for panoramic city views. Although the building serves as a tourist center, I find Perlan to be less of a bustle when compared to more popular ones like Hallgrímskirkja and Harpa. When I entered at around 10:00 a.m. on a weekday, I was quite surprised to see the place seemingly empty.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Perlan

Image by Keong Da Great.

Perlan is a landmark that lies on Öskjuhlíð hill. It used to have hot water storage tanks, which are the six giant cylinders you can see on the exterior. In 1991, a huge glass dome was placed on top of the cylinders. Today, Perlan consists of a museum, a restaurant, a cafe, and an outdoor observation deck that gives you a 360-degree view of the city. For more information on my winter vacation, you can also refer to my wife’s blog.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Reykjavik

Image by Keong Da Great.

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

Inspiration comes from many angles. It could be daily chores, objects, civilians on the street, buildings, or nature. Spending time observing others’ work can generate new ideas. Since my forte is landscape photography, I am most inspired by the works of Terje Sorgjerd, a Norwegian photographer. His phenomenal time-lapse work was what inspired me to plan an adventurous winter trip to Iceland for the Northern Lights.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Time-lapse

Time-lapse by Keong Da Great.

5.  “…the sparkling snow, and the picturesque Italian houses create the feeling that you are in a fairy tale.”

ansharphoto (Andrey Omelyanchuk)

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Selva Val Gardena

Image by ansharphoto (Andrey Omelyanchuk). Gear: Nikon D810 camera, Nikkor 24-70 f/2.8 lens, Really Right Stuff TVC-34L tripod with BH-55 ballhead. Settings: Focal length 24mm; exposure 30 sec; f11; ISO 80 (additional bracketed shots taken to recover highlights).

What are some of your favorite spots in the Dolomites?

The first time I discovered the Dolomites was when I went skiing with my family. I was shocked by the beauty of this place; the yellow peaks of the mountains, the beautiful sunny weather, the sparkling snow, and the picturesque Italian houses create the feeling that you are in a fairy tale.

Two of my passions, mountain skiing and photography, compete with each other all the time. I get up before dawn to see the sunrise and watch the village wake up. This is possibly the only moment when there are no tourists around. Then I wake my children up, and we ski until the ski lifts close. After that, I leave the skis and get a tripod and hurry to an observation point or to the village square to meet the sunset.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - The Dolomites

Image by ansharphoto (Andrey Omelyanchuk).

I am attracted to the fabulous cozy villages comfortably located in the huge snowcapped mountains. I go to various mountain paths to find the best perspective. My favorite ski resort villages in the Dolomites are Selva Val Gardena, Corvara, and Madonna di Campiglio.

On my last trip to Selva di Val Gardena, I found and shot a beautiful snow slope that descends into the village like a river. It took three days to research and find this particular spot. It was a very snowless week, which is not good for skiing but fortunate for a photographer. Due to the lack of snow, the only thing that was covered (with artificial snow) was the ski slope. It went through the village and looked striking with the snowless mountains in the background.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Madonna di Campiglio

Image by ansharphoto (Andrey Omelyanchuk).

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

When it comes to shooting nature at dawn or sunset, we never know what to expect. This is where the intrigue is. Waiting for a miracle gives me the strength to get up at night and walk along the snow-covered trails.

6.  “My favorite spots are the hiking trails to the various mountain huts of the Swiss Alpine Club.”

Peter Wey

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Bietschorn Mountain

Image by Peter Wey. Gear: Nikon D700 camera, Nikon 24mm f1.4 G lens. Settings: Exposure 1/50 sec; f9; ISO 200.

What are some of your favorite spots in the Swiss Alps?

My favorite spots are the hiking trails to the various mountain huts of the Swiss Alpine Club. These mountain huts are primarily targeted towards mountaineers, but they are awesome getaways for photographers as well. They can all only be accessed by foot and usually require multiple hours of long, strenuous hiking into the wilderness-perfect conditions to be off the beaten track of mass tourism. Sunrise and/or sunset in these places lead to special images.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Village Andermatt

Image by Peter Wey.

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

I find inspiration outdoors in the beauty of nature.

7.  “…one thing that makes this place so special is the dark nights in winter, when you can see the Aurora dancing over your head.”

Pung

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Fairbanks

Image by Pung. Gear: Nikon D800E camera, Nikon 16-35mm F4 lens. Settings: Focal length 18mm; exposure 20 sec; f4; ISO 2500.

What are some of your favorite spots in Fairbanks, Alaska?

The Mt. Aurora Ski Land in Fairbanks looks like a simple ski resort that can be found anywhere in the USA, but one thing that makes this place so special is the dark nights in winter, when you can see the Aurora dancing over your head. This place is a perfect spot for photographers who love hunting the Aurora because there are so many interesting foreground elements-such as the little huts, the snow plows, and the beautiful mountains. Remember to prepare a bag for your gloves and socks because the weather in winter is very cold (at night, it can reach -25 degrees Celsius).

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Aurora Borealis

Image by Pung.

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

My inspiration is the famous landscape photographer Sean Bagshaw. Sean’s images always make me want to improve my skills.

8.  “Turkey is very rich with its wonderful nature and civilizations. I enjoy spending time in nature and exploring historical ruins.”

Nejdet Duzen

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Cappadocia

Image by Nejdet Duzen. Gear: Nikon D90 camera, Nikon 18-105mm lens. Settings: Focal length 1-5mm; exposure 1/160 sec; f6.3; ISO 200.

What are some of your favorite spots in Cappadocia?

Cappadocia is Turkey’s most visually striking region, especially around the towns of Urgup, Goreme, Uchisar, and Avanos, where the process of erosion has formed caves, clefts, pinnacles, fairy chimneys, and sensuous folds in the soft volcanic rocks. This region becomes even more spectacular with the falling snow in the winter months. You can take better pictures of this magical landscape by taking a hot air balloon tour. The balloons take off early in the morning so you can take sunrise shots. The pilots also drive the balloons into the valleys.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Aerial Photography

Image by Nejdet Duzen.

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

Turkey is very rich with its wonderful nature and civilizations. I enjoy spending time in nature and exploring historical ruins. Every trip gives me new excitement and new inspiration.

9.  “Lac de Cheserys is definitely my favorite location for photography near Chamonix.”

Sander van der Werf

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Alps Near Chamonix

Image by Sander van der Werf. Gear: Canon EOS 5D III camera, EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM lens, Redged TSC-424 carbon tripod, Wire remote, LEE .75ND filter. Settings: Focal length 60mm; exposure 1/10 sec; f8; ISO 100. Panorama of four photos stitched in Lightroom.

What are some of your favorite spots in Chamonix?

Lac de Cheserys is definitely my favorite location for photography near Chamonix. However, it is hardly original, as a lot of people go there. And with good reason: it’s such a nice lake at a wonderful location. And it is a gorgeous place to pitch your tent while camping. If you are lucky, there is no wind and you have the most brilliant reflections in the lake. I will definitely visit again next year.

Col de Bellachat is also a nice place for photography. From this swampy col, you have an awesome view of Mont Blanc. Refuge de Bellachat is close by if you want to spend the night near the col.

When you are in Chamonix, you have to keep in mind that it is the climbing capital of the world. It attracts not only a lot of climbers but also many other tourists and fellow photographers. It’s a challenge to be original. However, the weather is never the same, and if you capture beautiful light at a famous location you still have a unique image. The timing of your photo might be more important than the originality of your location.

9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations - Lac de Cheserys

Image by Sander van der Werf.

Where do you find inspiration for your photography?

I get my inspiration from looking at and learning from photos made by great outdoor photographers. I follow them on platforms like 500px or Instagram, and I also get inspired by the outdoor magazines I read. Not only do they provide new ideas for interesting locations and trips, but it’s also useful to see what sort of photography these magazines use. Additionally, outdoor brands like Patagonia or Arc’Teryx use great photography, so it’s worth checking them out.

The post 9 Photographers on Capturing Famous Winter Destinations appeared first on The Shutterstock Blog.

Last Frame: Good Pawsture

Last Frame: Good Pawsture
Photo By Ruth Steck

Ruth Steck captured the image “Standing Tall” while visiting Churchill Wild at Nanuk Polar Bear Lodge in Manitoba, Canada. She was joined by guides and a film crew from Travel Manitoba when they set out in the hopes of seeing a few polar bears in the wild. “We were extremely lucky that year as the fall colors were late, and we had magnificent yellow, red and orange foliage,” Steck recalls. “As we approached the willows, we heard rustling noises. Just as we stopped, this male polar bear stood against the beautiful yellow backdrop, checking each of us out with a long stare. He stood for many minutes just looking at us before laying back down, completely hidden from view amongst the tall grasses.”

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III, Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM. Exposure: 1/2000 sec., ƒ/3.2, ISO 400.

See more of Ruth Steck’s photography at rmsteckphotography.com.

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